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Re-write of the SAMREC Code (2014)

The mining industry is a vital contributor to national and global economies; never more so than at present with soaring
demand for the commodities that it produces. It is a truly international business that depends on the trust and confidence
of investors and other stakeholders for its financial and operational well-being. Unlike many other industries, it is based
on depleting mineral assets, the knowledge of which is imperfect prior to the commencement of extraction. It is therefore
essential that the industry communicates the risks associated with investment effectively and transparently in order to earn the
level of trust necessary to underpin its activities. (CRIRSCO website)

SAIMM Logo Change

 SAIMM Logo 1894-20145  

The Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (SAIMM) has redesigned our logo to coincide with our 120th Anniversary. This logo is more aligned with the changes over the last two decades, while maintaining the professionalism that the SAIMM is renowned for. We have also emphasized the fact that we are 120 years old, and have continued to maintain our technical excellence with regard to our Journal and the events that we organize. To add to these achievements we continue to increase our membership.

The Parts of an Achievement of Arms and their Significance

The arms under consideration comprise separate parts, viz. Shield, Helm, Mantling, Crest, Supporters, Compartment, and Motto.

The Shield: This is in blue divided by a golden chevron, to represent the major sections of the industry. The flaming crucibles in the upper section represent Metallurgy and the crossed pick and shovel in the lower section represent Mining.

The Helm: This is an Esquire’s Helmet, which is the customary type of use for the arms of corporate bodies.

The Wreath and the Mantling: These are always in the two main ‘colours’ of the shield, in this case gold as a metal and blue as the colour. The mantling was originally a short cloak draped from the helmet as a protection against the sun, and the wreath helped to hold the crest in place.

The Crest: This served as an additional mark of distinction. In this case the demi-lion represents strength and holds the national flower of South Africa in his left Claw.

The Supporters: In this case heraldic beasts have been chosen, symbols of these ancient professions, the black lion representing mining and the golden dragon representing metallurgy. The ‘different’ marks on their shoulders are carried over from the shield of the Chemical, Mining and Metallurgical Society, and their colours and the diamonds in their collars are intended to represent the main fields of mining in South Africa, namely gold, coal, and diamonds.

The Compartments: This is, appropriately, an outcrop of rock.

The Motto: ‘Capaci Occasio’ has been taken over from the Institute’s predecessor, the Chemical, Mining and Metallurgical Society, with the exhortation, ‘to the capable the opportunity’.

                               

 

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New Africa prize highlights engineering as key development driver

New Africa prize highlights engineering as key development driver
South African engineers urged to submit entries

6 March 2014

Engineers from South Africa and other sub-Saharan countries are invited to enter a major new prize which rewards innovation and entrepreneurship in engineering.

The Royal Academy of Engineering (RAEng) today announced the launch of the first Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation and called for entries from engineers connected with universities and research institutions in sub-Saharan African countries.

The Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation is Africa’s biggest prize devoted to engineering innovation, covering all disciplines from mechanical, civil and computing to biomedical, oil and gas, mining and electronic engineering.

“Engineering is crucial to social and economic development in South Africa and internationally,” said Malcolm Brinded, a Fellow of the RAEng and Chair of the judging panel for the prize. The Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation aims to recognise the importance of African engineers and to stimulate innovation and entrepreneurship, while encouraging young people to become engineers by creating successful role models.”

“This new competition is designed to incentivise engineers to use their passion to develop innovative solutions to their country’s challenges. The Africa Prize will demonstrate how engineering is at the heart of economic development.”

South African judge of the prestigious Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation, Liesbeth Botha at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), commended the RAEng for launching the new prize. 

“The Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation will show how African engineers build countries, communities and economies, and put the spotlight on our education system to deliver professional engineers into the economy with the right knowledge and skills,” said Botha.

Engineers from all disciplines are invited to submit innovations with a social, economic or environmental benefit. Entries must be early-stage innovations which have the potential to be scaled-up and are ready for commercialisation. The deadline for entries is Friday 30 May 2014.

A shortlist of entrants will benefit from six months of extensive mentoring, training and support in commercialising their innovation. The overall winner will receive £25,000 and there will be an exhibition of all finalists’ entries.

The Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation is supported by the Shell Centenary Scholarship Fund, Consolidated Contractors Company, ConocoPhilips and the Mo Ibrahim Foundation.

“By encouraging talented engineers to apply their technical and entrepreneurial skills to development challenges in South Africa and the wider continent, we can help build stronger engineering capability, better equipped to develop scalable solutions to all kinds of local and regional challenges,” said Brinded.

“Over the year-long competition, we look forward to seeing great engineering ideas become viable projects that grow economies and improve societies.”

The RAEng is theUK’s national academy for engineering. It brings together successful engineers to advance and promote excellence in engineering. Encouraging and facilitating engineering innovation is a major focus of the Academy’s work, both domestically in the UK and in sub-Saharan Africa. A key component of its focus is on public understanding of engineering and increasing awareness of how engineering impacts lives.

Find out more at www.raeng.org.uk/AfricaPrize or africaprize@raeng.org.uk

Information for editors

The Royal Academy of Engineering
As the UK's national academy for engineering, we bring together the most successful and talented engineers for a shared purpose: to advance and promote excellence in engineering. We provide analysis and policy support to promote the UK's role as a great place to do business. We take a lead on engineering education and we invest in the UK's world-class research base to underpin innovation. We work to improve public awareness and understanding of engineering. We are a national academy with a global outlook. We have four strategic challenges: Drive faster and more balanced economic growth; foster better education and skills; lead the profession; promote engineering at the heart of society.

Judges of the Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation

Chair of Judges: Mr Malcolm Brinded - CBE FREng
Malcolm is Chairperson of the Shell Foundation, and a Non-Executive Director of Network Rail and of CH2M Hill. A British national, he graduated in Engineering from Cambridge University in 1974 and then had a 38 year career in Shell until his retirement, working in Brunei, The Netherlands, Oman and the UK. He was a member of the Royal Dutch Shell Board from 2002 to 2012, being Executive Director of global Exploration & Production from 2004 and of Upstream International from 2009. He was previously Shell UK Chairperson from 1999.  He has been a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering since 2002, and has served on Council and various Committees. He is current Vice-President of the Energy Institute, and a Fellow of the Institutions of Civil and Mechanical Engineering. He was awarded the CBE for services to the UK oil and gas industry in 2002, and the title of Dato Seri Laila Jasa by the Sultan of Brunei in 2011. Malcolm has been a UK Prime Minister's Business Ambassador, and a member of the Nigerian President's Advisory Council (2004-2012), the China International Council on Environment and Development, and was formerly a Trustee of the International Business Leaders Forum and of the Emirates Foundation.

Other judges include:
-
Dr Liesbeth Botha, Executive Director, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research,
  South Africa
- Stephen Dawson, Chairperson, Jacana Partners
- Professor Calestous Juma HonFREng, Harvard Kennedy School
- Dr Bola Olabisi, CEO, Global Women Inventors & Innovators Network

Media queries: Alex van Essche, Proof Communication Africa
alex@proofafrica.co.za +27 (0)11 4824860 +27 (0)82 321 1167

Brigadier Stokes Memorial Award - Corporate Member Notice

SAIMM Logo 1894-20145In 1980 the South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy instituted a prestigious award to commemorate Brigadier Stokes for his outstanding and unique contribution to the South African Mining Industry over a period of many years.

This award consists of a Platinum medal.

The award is made to an individual for the very highest achievement in the South African mining and metallurgical industry, and is not necessarily based on technical considerations.

As can be seen by the long list of illustrious recipients below, the nomination of an individual for this award is taken after much deliberation and input from the SAIMM Council. We therefore urge Corporate Members to take cognisance of the gravitas of this award when submitting their nominations.

Previous recipients have been:

1980 Mr H F Oppenheimer 
1981 Dr William Bleloch 
1982 Dr F G Hill
1983 Dr Austin Whillier (posthumous)      
1984 Prof D G Krige 
1985 Dr R E Robinson 
1986 Prof M D G Salamon 
1987 Dr T F Muller 
1988 Dr W J de Villiers 
1989 Dr R A Plumbridge 
1990 Mr W G Boustred 
1991 Mr P du P Kruger 
1992 Mr E Pavitt 
1993 Prof D A Pretorius 
1994 Dr H Wagner 
1995 Dr O K H Steffen 
1996 Mr B E Hersov                                         
1997 Prof D W Horsfall (posthumous)
1998 Mr B P Gilbertson
1999 Mr L Boyd
2000 Mr A H Mokken
2001 Mr T L Gibbs
2002 J Ogilvie Thompson
2003 Mr P V Cox
2004 Mr H J Smith
2005 Mr P Motsepe
2006 Prof G T van Rooyen
2007 Dr D H Laubscher
2008 Prof T R Stacey
2009 Dr C J Fauconnier
2010 Prof C T O'Connor
2011 B C Alberts
2012 R P Mohring
2013 Prof H R Phillips                                    

Should you be aware of anyone who would be deserving of this award in 2014, would you please let me have your nomination, together with a short motivation supporting this nomination by not later than Wednesday, 21 May 2014.

All previously nominated individuals will automatically be included for consideration for the 2014 award.

For any further information:

Sam Moolla at sam@saimm.co.zaalt

PREVENTING ‘ACCIDENTS’ IN CONSTRUCTION

Professor John Smallwood, PhD (Construction Management) Pr CM PrCHSA FCIOB MACHASM MACPM MESSA MICOH MIOSH MIoSM MSAIOSH
Department of Construction Management, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

Introduction
Fatalities, injuries, and disease continue to occur in South African construction and the recent Tongaat Mall collapse resulted in a frenzy of media attention, only to dissipate similar to a spent firecracker. Needless to say various stakeholders are interested in the causes, and the Department of Labour has investigated and will continue to investigate the „accident‟. The question is: „What will the findings be?‟

Fatalities, injuries, disease, and inadequate H&S, non-compliance included, will continue to occur till such time that the following are a feature of, and / or optimised in the South African construction industry.

'Failure of management' versus 'Accident'
There is no such thing as an „accident‟ (Myth)! Traditional definitions include, among other: „An unplanned event‟. Are „accidents‟ unplanned? Absolutely not! Any review will indicate that they are meticulously planned by default i.e. through actions and or omissions. Consequently, given that the five functions of management work are planning, organising, leading, controlling, and coordinating, then unplanned events such as „accidents‟ = „failure of management‟ (Reality). Effectively, the aforementioned is a philosophy and constitutes a state of mind. However, the term management must not be construed to apply solely to contractors, as there is a management echelon in all built environment stakeholder organisations, including client, project manager, designer, and quantity surveyor.

Is there a gap between graduate competencies and the expectations of the built environment industry in South Africa?

The construction of the Gautrain, the revamping of transport infrastructure and erection of nine stadia for the FIFA 2010 World Cup between 2006 and 2010 are glimpse of what South Africa can achieve when the State and the private sector seamlessly align planning and construction. However, rolling countrywide service delivery protests are a reminder that not all is well. The Presidency, in the National Development Plan admitted in 2011 that South Africa did not appear to have the capacity to deliver on its policies and programmes.

MANAGER: REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Applications are invited for the newly created position of Manager: Regional Development with the Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. The primary purpose of this job is to sustainably expand non-South African membership of the SAIMM by establishing and supporting National Branches in neighbouring countries. Secondary activities are related to representation of the SAIMM on appropriate industry-level forums that support membership growth and Institute sustainability.

MQA gives Wits University over R20 million

17 March 2014 - Johannesburg: The Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA) handed over a cheque for more than R20 million to Wits University on Friday, 14 March 2014. The money will go towards support for seven lecturers in mining engineering and bursaries for 236 students in the following disciplines: analytical, chemical, electrical, industrial, mechanical, metallurgical, and mining engineering, and geology.

Book Review - Digging Deep

Jade Davenport, the author of Digging Deep, has written a very readable book on the historic contribution that mining has made in developing South Africa into a modern industrial state. It is not necessarily a must-read for people in the mining industry, but the book is well written and should be seen as a South African mining biography.

The SAIMM Library

The library has been indexed and sorted. Although it is not as big as we would like it to be, we have a fair number of reference books and a certain amount of resource material.

Access to the library and the control of the borrowing process is in the hands of Kea Shumba.

The titles are available on the website at the following link: http://www.saimm.co.za/saimmlibrary?task=showCategory&catid=32

Sam Moolla, Manager: SAIMM Secretariat

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Mining Weekly | Africa

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